Who You Gonna Call?

Apologies to Ray Parker Jr. While your question or a problem may not be about ridding your neighborhood of ghosts, “Who You Gonna Call” to get the answer or solution that you need?

Getting help on the Internet or on your mobile device is easy—type it into the search box of your favorite Internet search engine or ask Siri, now Alexa and Cortana, too, but it’s not always easy to get an answer or a solution to complex, detailed, or involved questions and problems. Who You Gonna Call with those?

Questions and Problems

Over the past several months, your blogger has had quite few questions and problems for which answers and solutions were not so easy to find. Here are some of them:

  • My Whirlpool electric dryer doesn’t heat (or maybe it overheats before it doesn’t heat).
  • My Toro gasoline powered lawnmower is hard to start and stalls when it does start.
  • My new iPhone 6s doesn’t pair with the Bluetooth audio system in my car.
  • Which should I buy: an electric induction cooktop, a standard electric cooktop, or a natural gas cooktop?

DIY Answers and Solutions

Getting answers and solutions to these question and problems involves getting your hands dirty, literally or figuratively. These questions and problems are about what things do, how things are put together/assembled, and the way that things work. I want the inside information that I can use to get to explain the answers and apply the fixes myself. I’m a DIY (Do It Yourself) kind of person, a DIYer. I’m willing and eager and I have tools. I enjoy the challenge and I revel in the satisfaction of getting the answers or fixing the problems myself. I’m not looking for a pro to do the work for me for a fee.

So who was your blogger gonna call to get answers and fixes to the list of questions and problems? Let’s take a look at these possibilities:

  • Social networks
  • Communities and forums
  • YouTube
  • Brand sites
  • Build and repair sites

Social Networks

Crowd sourcing answers and fixes from the members of might not work for these kinds of questions and problems. While many of my friends and followers are DIY kind of people, too, the most I expect from a crowd-sourced approach is a reference to a web site or to an expert. Very helpful to be sure, but a step removed from what I need.

Communities and Forums

Communities and forums let members post questions and problems within topics in the hopes that other community members will reply with comments that contain answers and solutions. There are two types of communities and forums. Communities of the first type are hosted and moderated by the brand about which customers ask questions or pose problems and receive answers and solutions from other customer as well as from subject matter experts (SMEs) who may also be customers or may be on the brand’s customer service staff. These communities can be very helpful, especially so when the brand’s employees monitor and moderate customers’ questions and problems. Brand employee participation ensures correct answers and solutions. They’re not so helpful when their answers and solutions lack detail or when their topics do not include the subjects of questions and problems. We’ve seen communities for ISVs that seem only to suggest consulting services as answers and solutions. We’ve seen communities with topics only about making suggestions for product or service improvements or only about customer experience with a brand.

The second type of community or forum is hosted and managed independently of the brand that is the subject of its topics. Posts on these communities commonly contain complex, detailed, technical questions and problems. Comments frequently contain exactly the answers and solutions in the level of detail that DIYers crave. On the other hand, many of these communities have no moderation or monitoring by SMEs. They exercise no control over comments. For example, below is a post from acuraworld.com that accurately represents my question about Bluetooth pairing a new iPhone. The comment contains an unmoderated and unappealing answer.

iphone acura bluetooth

© 2016 Acuraworld

Perhaps this answer does solve the problem, but I would never “Reset All Settings” on my iPhone to solve it. A better answer lists the steps to establish a new pairing in the car, a pain for sure because voice tags are phone-specific in my car’s system. Be careful with communities and forums.

YouTube

YouTube has a huge library of DIY videos. Find the video that answers your question or solves your problem by searching within the site. YouTube’s videos are posted by brands, by repair pros, and DIYers. YouTube does not monitor or moderate their content. So, DIYer beware. Be careful of whose advice you take.

A YouTube DIYer video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ni-rdRyxA0, contained the fix to my starting/stalling lawnmower problem. I found it after searching independent communities for the problem symptom and learning that my problem was somewhere in the lawnmower’s fuel system, likely the carburetor. Note that Toro.com, the brand site for my lawnmower, was similar to Whirpool.com, offering downloads of product manuals.

Brand Sites

Brand web sites of brands may contain the level of information that answers detailed questions or that fixes problems with their products. For my dryer problem, I went to whirlpool.com, clicked the Owners tab, and clicked the Support tab to get to this site:

whirlpool support

© 2016 Whirlpool

I followed the Manuals tab/Find Manuals link then enter the Model number. For my model, Whirlpool provides three downloads:

  • Owners Manual
  • Installation Instructions
  • Parts List

The Owners Manual is a “Use and Care Guide.” Its content is not model-specific or even specific to dryer type—electric or gas. It does contain an If You Need Assistance or Service section that provides some high-level troubleshooting information as well as telephone numbers and mailing addresses (It’s an old dryer.). The Parts List contains numbered schematics and corresponding lists of parts numbers and brief description or names of every single part of the dryer. This information is essential to every fix because every fix usually requires replacement of broken parts and parts numbers are the mechanism for their identification. The Parts List manual also provides an idea of how the dryer is assembled and of how it works. The heating element, thermostats, and fuses are the causes and effects of not heating and overheating. These are parts are numbers 6, 7, 8, 15, and 17 on the schematic for Bulkhead Parts shown below.

whirlpool parts

© 2016 Whirlpool

Looking at the schematic, it’s difficult to visualize an assembled dryer and the locations of and accesses to the heating element, thermostats, and fuses. Mechanical/electrical aptitude and actual repair experience are required for that. You’ll have them after a single repair, but don’t call a pro yet. More online help is available.

Repair and Parts Sites

Repair and parts sites are exactly that online help. My fav is repairclinic.com. Go there, enter your model number and you’ll see an extremely helpful page like this:

repair clinic 2

© 2016 RepairClinic.com, Inc

In addition to a list of parts with pictures and descriptions, Repair Clinic also provides a list of Common Problems on the left of the page. Click “Dryer overheating” to reach this page:

repairclininc

© 2016 RepairClinic.com, Inc

Now the fix is very close. This page contains everything you’ll need to understand how dryers work, how/why they break, diagnose and verify the problem, identify the part causing the problem, and order the part to fix the problem. The ordered list of likely causes with descriptions and videos is especially helpful. I love this site. It contains similar information for lawn equipment, heating and cooling, and power tools as well as appliances. But, repairclinic.com is not the only site that provides diagnostics and parts for fixing these types of problems.

SearsPartsDirect.com contains information similar to RepairClinic.com and not just for Sears’ products. ThisOldHouse.com the web site for the long-running PBS series contains a wealth of answers and solutions to a wide range of home improvement and repair questions, problems, and projects. Answers and solutions are easy to understand videos presented by the show’s experts. The video library is continually growing.

Cooktops

The last item in my list is a product research question about cooktops and a tax question about annuities. Regarding cooktops, I was ready to replace my 30 something year old electric cooktop with a gas cooktop. My product research started, as it usually does on ConsumerReports.org. It’s a subscription site. I’ve been a subscriber and a member for many years. First, I looked at the Buying Guide for cooktops where I learned about electric induction cooktops. The description and analysis changed my mind about gas. Then I went to product ratings of electric induction cooktop products. Consumer Reports rated GE Profile products highly and my wife and I have been very happy with the other GE Profile appliances in our kitchen. That’s what we bought. Of course, I installed it.

Recommendations

The Internet is a wonderful resource for getting DIY answers and solutions. The challenge for DIYers will be identifying the correct and most usable answers and solutions from a myriad of reasonable possibilities. Who You Gonna Call? Generally, we recommend:

  • Brand sites
  • Moderated and monitored communities
  • Build and repair sites
  • YouTube

More specifically, RepairClininc.com and, especially, ConsumerReports.org are our favorites. Your subscription and membership fees to Consumer Reports will be paid back many times over with the best product research.

 

 

Analytics in Radian6

This week’s report is our evaluation of Radian6, the component of Salesforce Marketing Cloud that does social monitoring, analysis, and interaction. Its tight integration with Salesforce Service Cloud—automatic creation of Cases and Contacts—makes it the obvious social-service choice to add to the customer service application portfolio of Salesforce CRM users

Customer social-service is all about monitoring customers’ conversations in the social cloud, identifying customers with questions, problems, and issues, and then interacting with those customers to answer questions, solve problems, and address issues. The number of customer posts and conversations in the social cloud that may be relevant to a business can be very large, ranging to thousands or even tens of thousands per week and, in the extreme, hundreds of thousands per day. Monitoring and analyzing all of them, identifying the (few) posts that require attention, and then handling each one individually and handling all of them consistently are daunting and complex tasks, daunting because of the sheer volume and complex by the diversity and nuance of language, breadth of topics, and depth of emotion (sentiment).

Most social-service products use third parties to monitor social posts, to crawl and search the key social networks and the hundreds of millions of blogs and forums where customers ask questions, get answers, and make comments.  The value-add of these products is in their analytic capabilities, capabilities that can “understand” the content of social posts. Natural Language Processing (NLP), sometimes called text analytics, is the technology that they most commonly use. And, also most commonly, each of them is built its own NLP implementation. Their companies are built on it, too. These NLP implementations are frequently patented and almost always proprietary. They’re the crown jewels of analytics companies. So, the selection of a social-service application usually involves the evaluation and comparison of NLP implementations, a difficult selection of sophisticated and complex technology.

Not the case for Radian6. It takes the opposite approach. Rather than leverage the data collection capabilities of third parties and apply its own analytics, Radian6 does its own data collection (The current version searches and crawls over 650 million social sources.) and leverages the analytic capabilities of third-party analytics suppliers to understand the content of social posts. (Radian does a bit of its own analytics, too, although its analytics are a bit basic and are not built on NLP.) These 14, third-party analytics suppliers comprise what Salesforce.com calls the Radian6 Insights Ecosystem, Insights for short. They apply their analytic technologies to the social posts collected by Radian6.

The 14 are:

  • Bitext
  • Communication Explorer
  • Clarabridge
  • EpiAnalytics
  • Hottolink
  • Klout
  • LeadSift
  • Lymbix
  • OpenAmplify
  • Open Calais
  • PeekAnalytics
  • Soshio
  • The SelfService Company
  • Trendspottr

Let’s take a little closer look at three Insights to get an idea of their capabilities.

  • The Bitext Sentiment analytic perform Entity extraction and sentiment analysis for posts in Spanish (European and Latin American), Portuguese (Brazilian and European), Italian, and English using natural language processing technology (NLP).
  • Clarabridge provides two analytics. Clarabridge Link Sentiment provides sentiment analysis of social posts in Chinese, Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish using NLP; Clarabridge Link Classification applies a Universal Category and Classification model to social posts in Chinese, Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish using NLP.
  • OpenAmplify also provides two analytics. OpenAmplify Cust Svc uses NLP to identify social posts containing potential customer service issues and the topics of those potential issues. OpenAmplify uses NLP to identify sentiment, intention, and topics of social posts.

Salesforce.com offers these Insights like usage-priced cell phone minutes within the subscription licenses and their monthly fees for Radian6 Editions. (Editions are licensing tiers that bundle applications resources.) More specifically, Radian6 Editions include blocks of Insights partner credits. The analysis of one social post by a one analytic application from one partner costs one partner credit. At the low end, Marketing Cloud Radian Basic Edition includes 1,000 Insights partner credits. At the high end, Marketing Cloud Radian Enterprise Edition includes 500,000 Insights partner credits. Blocks of 10,000 additional Insight partner credits are available for a fee of $100 per month. Credits are expire every month (like cell phone minutes).

Insights’ suppliers set up pre-configured deployments of their analytic applications for access and usage by Radian6 licensees at runtime. That approach can be a disadvantage. For NLP based Insights, runtime access means that language models and processing configurations are those implemented by their suppliers for general-purpose usage, not language models and configurations of deployments tailored to the applications and vocabularies of specific businesses and their customers. For example, the Clarabridge Link Classification Insight uses a “Universal Category and Classification” to classify social posts. Analytic processing will still be quite useful, just not custom tailored.

There are also advantages to Radian6’s Insights approach of runtime access to analytic applications. Most significantly, Radian6 lets businesses easily combine and nest these analytics. For example, analysts might use the entity, fact, and event extraction capabilities of Open Calais to find posts relevant to a product launch and then use PeekAnalytics to identify the demographics of those posters. Also, specifying language models and processing configurations for NLP-based analytic applications is complex work, work that Radian6 users do not have to do to get much of the benefits of these sophisticated applications.

The approach to analysis in Radian6 is a significant differentiator and a key factor for selection. Radian6 delivers most of the power of a wide array of third-party analytic applications and the flexibility to use them separately or to combine their processing. Pricing is based on usage. Value is very good.