Oracle Service Cloud Virtual Assistant

Oracle Service Cloud Virtual Assistant is a relatively new brand (November 2013) that dates back to 2001 when it was known as Q-go, a product with the same name as its privately held, Amsterdam, NE-based and supplier. Q-go, the product, was first commercially deployed in 2001.

Neither RightNow, which acquired Q-go in 2011, nor Oracle, which acquired RightNow in 2013, has done very much to enhance the old Q-go other than to rebrand it. (RightNow branded it RightNow Intent Guide and Natural Language Search at the time of the 2011 Q-go acquisition. As we mentioned just above, Oracle branded it Virtual Assistant in November 2013.) Today, Oracle Service Cloud Virtual Assistant doesn’t support voice. It deploys on web browsers in HTML. Its deployments are language-specific and only Western European languages are supported.

However even after all this time, the product technology remains reasonably attractive and quite useful. The product’s core NLP technology, the technology developed by Q-go that analyzes customers’ questions and matches them with knowledgebase answers remains fresh and innovative. This is the technology that makes virtual assistants that are deployed on Virtual Assistant powerful and flexible.

Briefly, here’s how it (still) works. Customers enter questions as natural language sentences or phrases or as individual keywords or short “telegram-style” phrases. Virtual Assistant uses NLP technology to analyze customers’ questions and to match them with Questions in its knowledgebase.

  • If Virtual Assistant finds a Question that is a best match with a customer’s question, then it presents the knowledgebase Answer that is linked to the Question.
  • If Virtual Assistant cannot find a best match, it presents a short list of Questions that are likely matches to customer’s question. From this list, the customer selects the Question that best represent her/his question. Virtual Assistant delivers the Answer associated with the Question selected by the customer.
  • Alternatively, the matching Question may trigger a Prompt and Response Dialog with the customer to arrive at an Answer through conditional sequence of steps.
  • Virtual Assistant presents the knowledgebase Answers that are linked to the Questions that best match the customers’ questions.

Here’s an example from klm.com. KLM Royal Dutch Airlines had deployed Q-go. The Customer Support tab on klm.com continues to use the NLP technology to answer customers’ questions.

I asked the question, “golf clubs,” two keywords, certainly not a full sentence or even a good phrase. Virtual Assistant did not find a single best match. It found five likely matches and presented them as links as shown in the screen shot below.

blog klm 1

Question 3, “Can I take a golf bag with me,” represents our question. I clicked it and klm.com presented the Answer shown in the screen shot below.

blog klm 2

That’s exactly the information I was looking for, a “Very useful” Answer. I then clicked the “Read more about taking a golf bag” link to get additional information. See the screen shot below for that information.

blog klm 3

Pretty good, no? Flexible and powerful. When Virtual Assistant can’t find a best match, finding and presenting a short list of likely, possible matches is very useful. It’s a reasonable and fast extra step to take to get to that best match. Note though that this example was not implemented by a completely automatic process. No surprise there. Analysts and administrators had some work to do to specify and manage the keywords that customers would likely use and to associate those keywords with knowledgebase Questions, like those in the first screen shot,  to help Virtual Assistant find likely matches. They also had to specify and manage the Questions.

Oracle certainly has some work to do to bring Virtual Assistant up to its competition, but the work builds on a very good foundation. Read our Product Evaluation Report to get the details.

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Customer Service Integration

This week’s report is our 1Q2014 Customer Service Update. Briefly, 1Q2014 was a quiet quarter for customer service. Customer growth was down. Only Clarabridge improved significantly in both customer acquisition and repeat business. Product activity was light. Five of our suppliers did not make any product announcements. Company activity was light. Four suppliers did not make any company announcements. Most significantly, Verint acquired KANA. Clarabridge earned a Customer Service Star for 1Q2014 for outstanding customer growth, for significant company activity, and for earning an excellent product evaluation.

We observed one customer service trend—customer service integration. Very important. Customer Service Integration is one of the key criteria in all of our frameworks for evaluating customer service products. Customer service integration can reduce cost to serve and increase customer satisfaction. Integration expands and streamlines the customer service experience. It makes it easier for customers to get answers to their questions and solutions to their problems. It makes it easier for customer service agents to help customers.

For example, from our framework for evaluating virtual agent/virtual assisted-service products, we state, “Through integration with external customer service applications, virtual agent software product deployments can escalate to assisted-service chat or contact center telephone channels, deliver virtual assisted-service on social networks, and/or can answer a wider range of questions, questions that involve the data in cases and accounts, for instance. Integration makes virtual agents more powerful, creating a richer, broader, and deeper virtual assisted-service experience. Integration lowers cost to serve, deflecting/avoiding high-cost interactions with live agents.”

The important integration targets for several types of customer service applications are shown in the Table below. Our evaluation frameworks are the source.

Customer Service Integration
Customer Service Application Type Integration Targets
Virtual agent
  • Account management
  • Case management
  • Contact center
  • Knowledge management
  • Live chat
  • Social networks
Social customer service
  • Account management
  • Case management
  • Contact center
  • Communities
  • Knowledge management
Contact center/Case management
  • Account management
  • Communities
  • Knowledge management
  • Live chat
  • Social networks/Social customer service
  • Virtual agents

Table 1. In this Table we present the key integration targets for several types of customer service applications.

In practice, we’ve seen broad and deep customer service integration within CRM suites and customer service suites such as Oracle Service Cloud and Salesforce Service Cloud. For example, Salesforce Service Cloud and Salesforce Sales Cloud are both implemented on the Salesforce1 platform. Platform resources include account data so account management is built in to Service Cloud. The Service Cloud Console gives agents access to cases. Salesforce Knowledge, the firm’s knowledge management offering, Salesforce Communities, the firm’s internal communities offering, and Live Agent, the firm’s live chat offering, are Service Cloud features. Salesforce Social Hub, a feature of the Radian6 component of Salesforce Marketing Cloud, which provides social listening and interaction capabilities, integrates social customer service. While many of these features are separately packaged and separately priced, all are very tightly integrated and that integration is “in the box.”

Individual customer service applications typically do not package integration with external customer service applications. We’ve heard from suppliers of these applications that integration can be accomplished by their professional services organizations, that it’s a “simple matter of programming,” and that they’ve written this code for many of their customers. That may be so, but professional service programming is not product. New releases on either side of the integration interface mean additional custom programming. Programming is never simple.

Alternatively, licensees of these products commonly do integration “at the desktop.” Customer service agents’ desktops have a window open for each of the applications they need to help answer their customers’ questions or solve their problems. Integration at the desktop is complicated. The integration burden is on agents.

This quarter, eGain, IntelliResponse, and Oracle announced new customer service integration. The eGain SAP Certified integration allows contact center agents to search and access the eGain Knowledge Base from the SAP CRM agent console using eGain’s FAQs, natural language and keyword search queries, topic trees, and guided help search methods. The IntelliResponse Virtual Agent (VA) for Salesforce integrates IntelliResponse VA with Salesforce Service Cloud, adding virtual assisted-service to the Service Cloud Console, the Customer Portal, and Service Cloud Communities. In the Oracle Service Cloud February 2014 release, the dynamic forms API for the Customer Portal enables developers to configure a page that asks the customer for additional information, dynamically, before submitting the incident.

We hope that more customer service suppliers will recognize the value in customer service integration. Customer service integration makes their offerings more attractive. It helps their customers create and deliver a better customer service experience, reducing cost to serve and increasing customer satisfaction. It makes it easier and faster for their customers’ customers to get answers and solutions. That’s’ a win, win, win, a no-brainer for sure.

A Good Quarter for Customer Service in 3Q2013

This week, continuing our tenth year of quarterly updates on the suppliers and products in customer service, we published our 3Q2013 Customer Service Update Report. Just a reminder, these reports examine customer service suppliers and their products along the dimensions of customer growth, financial performance, product activity, and company activity. We currently cover ten leading customer service suppliers. They lead in overall market influence and share, in market segment influence and share, and/or in product technology and innovation.

3Q2013 was a good quarter for customer service. Customer growth was up and improved customer growth resulted in improved financial performance. Product activity was light. Six of our suppliers did not make any product announcements, but remember that third quarters are summer quarters. They’re usually never big for products. Company activity was also on the light side but what company action we saw was highlighted by expansion into new markets by four of our suppliers. That’s a key customer service trend and a solid indicator of customer service growth in the quarters ahead. Here’s a bit more detail:

  • On July 17, IntelliResponse and BolderView, a Melbourne, AU-based consultancy specializing in virtual agent solutions for large enterprises in utilities, banking, technology, higher education and government markets, jointly announced that BolderView had become a value-added reseller of IntelliResponse VA for Australia and New Zealand. Within the release, IntelliResponse also announced the opening of its own office in Sydney, AU.
  • On September 5, KANA and Wipro jointly announced a partnership that will apply Wipro’s consulting, systems integration, and insurance industry expertise and experience to accelerate deployments of KANA Enterprise for large global insurers and financial services providers. The companies will form a dedicated, joint deployment team to work on customer deployments.
  • On September 17, Clarabridge announced the expansion of its global operations into Latin America. A sales team will use Miami, FL offices and will leverage Clarabridge’s partnerships with Accenture, Deloitte, and Salesforce.com initially to focus on opportunities in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru.
  • On September 25, Moxie announced the expansion of its operations in Europe. The expansion includes opening an office in Reading, UK, forming partner ships with Spitze & Company in Denmark and IZO in Spain, and appointing Andrew Mennie General Manager for EMEA.

This expansion is a win for customer service suppliers, a win for their customers, and a win for their customers’ customers.

It’s already winning for customer service suppliers. For example, Moxie claims to have doubled its European customer base in the last six months. New customers include Allied Irish Bank and the British Army. IntelliResponse and BolderView recently launched “Olivia,” their first joint virtual agent deployment. Olivia is the virtual agent for Optus, Australia’s second largest telecommunications provider. And, Creative Virtual, a UK-based virtual agent software supplier that we’ve been covering in our quarterly reports for the past four quarters, recently announced Sabine, the Dutch-speaking virtual agent for NIBC Direct, the online retail unit of The Hague, NE-based bank. Sabine’s deployment is supported from Creative Virtual’s new Amsterdam office. See Sabine at the bottom right of NIBC Direct’s home page, below.

nibc png

Expansion demonstrates the strength and viability of customer service suppliers. Their products have reached the level of maturity and reliability that their deployment “far from home” carries little or no risk. They have the resources to open offices and hire the staff to promote, sell, and support their products in new markets. And they recognize the potential for new and additional business in those markets.

Our suppliers’ customers and their (end) customers in Australia and New Zealand, Latin America, and Europe benefit, too. Customer service applications like Clarabridge Analyze, a CEM (Customer Experience Management) app, Creative Virtual V-Person and IntelliResponse VA (Virtual Agent) virtual agents apps, and Moxie Social Knowledgebase, a social customer service app have been proven to lower cost to serve and to improve customer experiences. Companies in expanded markets that deploy these apps will have more satisfied, more profitable customers. These apps will help answer customers’ questions and solve customers’ problems more quickly and more easily.

We’ve been ready for this expansion. Language support has long been a criterion in our frameworks for evaluating customer service applications. We examine the languages that the apps support for internal users and the globalization/localization facilities to deploy the apps to end customers. Generally, we’ve found that most customer service apps can be localized to support locale-specific deployments. On the other hand, the tools and reporting capabilities for internal users tend to be implemented and supported only in English.

Product Evaluation: Oracle Service Cloud Social Experience

Oracle Service Cloud Social Experience 

Our evaluation of the August 2013 Release of Oracle Service Cloud Social Experience is this week’s report. You may be more familiar with the product by its former RightNow CX Social Experience or Oracle RightNow Cloud Service Social Experience names. Oracle acquired RightNow in January 2012 and, without a formal announcement, renamed the product sometime during 2Q2013. One other point about the acquisition, the former RightNow R&D team has continued to develop the product, has continued to work out of the former RightNow headquarters site in Bozeman, and has continued the regular, quarterly releases of the product.

Social Experience is one of three “Experiences” in Oracle Social Cloud. The other two are Agent Experience and Web Experience. Each is aptly named for the channel that it supports. The three share a base of common data (Customers, accounts, cases, and knowledge items, for example) and services including business rules, process management, user management, and reporting. Also, product packaging and pricing puts Social Experience “in the box” with Agent and Web Experience. So, social customer service is really built into Oracle Service Cloud and that’s its key strength and differentiator.

Social Experience has these three components:

  • Communities, which supports internal community capabilities of posts and responses on topic threads. Oracle Service Cloud Social Experience Communities is based on technology developed by HiveLive that the then RightNow acquired in 2009.
  • Social Monitor, which provides capabilities to monitor posts on the social web—Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and RSS feeds as well as Communities, to analyze the content of monitored social posts, and to interact with social posters.
  • Self Service for Facebook, which lets organizations deploy Oracle Service Cloud web experience and Communities capabilities on their Facebook pages to help Facebook users access Oracle Service Cloud Social Experience Communities and knowledgebase as well as to create cases.

Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, RSS, and Social Experience Communities are the social sources monitored by Social Experience. While these are certainly the key social networks, the product does not monitor some sources that are critical to customer service, particularly external communities, forums, and blogs. These are sources that customers very commonly use to get answers to questions and solutions to problems. That Social Experience doesn’t monitor them is a serious limitation. Oracle already has the technology to address this limitation, technology that came with its June 2012 acquisition of Collective Intellect. Collective Intellect’s IP was social monitoring and analysis technology. Oracle told us that it’s working on integrating this technology with Oracle Service Cloud.

Twitter for Customer Service

On the topic of Twitter, last week, Patty Seybold published, “Four Reasons Why Customers Prefer Twitter for Customer Service,” a report about how businesses and their customers use Twitter as a key channel for customer service. Patty proposes seven best practices for Twitter-based customer service. Oracle Service Cloud Social Experience can help implement four of the seven—Treat Twitter as an Integrated Customer Service Channel, If You Have Lots of Customers, Establish Customer Service Twitter Accounts, Defuse Anger Publicly; Take the Issue Private, Gather Customers’ Ideas for Next-Gen Products. You’ll implement the other three—Set Customers’ Expectations Re: Times of Day You’ll Respond to Tweets in Real Time, Respond within Minutes, and Don’t Use Automated Responses!—with customer service policies, standards, and procedures. Here are the four with brief descriptions of how Oracle Service Cloud Social Experience helps implement them.

  • Treat Twitter as an Integrated Customer Service Channel

Social Experience Social Monitor searches Twitter for Tweets that are relevant to customer service. Agents and/or analysts specify search queries as strings of language-specific terms of 255 characters or fewer. Queries strings may include the exact match (“”), AND, or OR operators. Analysts can save search queries for execution at a later time or for (regularly) scheduled execution.

Social Experience Social Monitor can automatically create customer service cases from the Tweets in search results and automatically appends the info in subsequent Tweets from the same Twitter account to them.

Social Experience captures customers’ Twitter account info within search results and includes them within Oracle Service Cloud customer data.

  • If You Have Lots of Customers, Establish Customer Service Twitter Accounts

Social Experience supports multiple corporate Twitter accounts that it shares among its users. (It supports corporate Facebook accounts, too.) Businesses can create a hierarchy of corporate Twitter accounts for customer service, organizing them in any appropriate manner—by customer or customer company, by products, by customer service level, or by severity or priority, for example. And, Social Experience’s Corporate Twitter accounts can be set to follow customers’ Twitter accounts.

  • Defuse Anger Publicly; Take the Issue Private

Agents specify whether each of their Tweets on their corporate accounts is public or private.

  • Gather Customers’ Ideas for Next-Gen Products

Cases generated from Social Monitor search results can be ideas for next-gen products as well as the representation of questions and problems.

Pretty good, although a bit of content-based alerting on search results could automate Twitter monitoring. Note that these capabilities of Social Experience’s to support Twitter are capabilities that we’ve seen in other social monitoring and analysis offerings, offerings including Attensity Analyze, and Respond, Clarabridge Analyze, Collaborate, and Engage, and KANA Experience Analytics. All of these offerings have been available for a few years. They’re widely-used and well-proven. Any of them can help make Twitter an integrated customer service channel.

Going forward, we’ll extend our framework for evaluating social customer service products to include Patty’s best practices as